Top 3 Reasons You Shouldn’t Write Your Own Will

November 23, 2021 |

will, drafting a will, lawyer, hiring a lawyer, writing your own will, lawyers

Top 3 Reasons You Shouldn’t Write Your Own Will

While writing your own will may save you a little bit of money, it will cost your family a lot of time, aggravation, and possible legal fees in the future. It’s important to remember that a will is a legal document and drafting one on your own without any legal advice can be dangerous. Here are the top three reasons you shouldn’t write your own will.

 

1. It May Impact The Validity Of Your Will

In order for a will be deemed valid, it has to follow a set of legal procedures. If you don’t have experience with the legal system, or know much about the legalities of wills, then it could cause your will to be considered invalid. Truth be told, there are a lot of laws – and that’s why there’s professionals out there to help you. Much like you wouldn’t perform your own surgery, you shouldn’t try to handle important legal documents without a lawyer. To avoid writing an invalid will, hire a lawyer to help you.

 

2. You Will Need To Have A Good Understanding Of State Laws

State laws are all over the place when it comes to estate taxes, probate, and inheritance taxes and there’s not a one-size-fits-all when it comes to estate planning. There are legal formalities that are required to write and sign a valid will. If you don’t have a firm understanding of your state laws, then your family could run into some major, costly problems in the future. Mistakes when it comes to legal documents such as your will can cost a fortune – literally.

Do you understand the estate and inheritance tax in your state? Do you know how to plan for it to be handled once you pass? There is a lot to know and understand – and a lot of room to make errors and mistakes. Hiring a lawyer, however, frees you from the burden of having to know all these details. Not only that, but it gives you peace of mind that all your I’s are dotted, and your t’s are crossed.

3. Your Intentions May Not Be Clearly Stated – Even If You Think So

You know your intentions and your wishes, but was it clearly laid out in your will? Maybe – or maybe not. If your will is inadequate or unclear, it will have to go through probate, the judicial process where a will must be proved in court. People leave wills for family members in order to make sure there are no questions when it comes to property and assets. Not only that, but it leaves time for the family to grieve their loss rather than cleaning up one big mess. Creating a will on your own could raise a lot of questions – especially when your intentions weren’t clearly stated like you thought. That’s why it’s important and necessary to hire a lawyer to help you.

 

Need Help Drafting A Will? Houser Firm in Dallas, TX and Surrounding Areas is Here To Help!

Contact us today to schedule a consultation with one of our lawyers at 972-763-5415 or online here.

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